Tag Archives: AAF

Latest intel: Insider attacks a threat to ISAF

Note to ISAF Commander:  Read the news (or fire your intelligence staff). 

After more than a year on the job and countless “insider” or green-on-blue attacks before and during his tenure, GEN Allen has realized that Afghans within the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) may be a significant threat.  In the CBS News interview Insider attacks kill U.S troops in Afghanistan, he states, “Here, I think the signature attack that we’re beginning to see the– is going to be the insider attack.”

Excuse me?  Excusez-moi (for those reading in Gulfe Juan)?  “. . . Beginning to see. . . ?”  Our military have been getting killed by uniformed Afghans for years!  I’m dumbfounded by the ignorance of recent events, the General’s epiphany, and desperately wrestling with some respectful way to call our military leaders idiots at best and political stooges at worst.  

Over a year ago, everyone in ISAF (well, at least NTM-A) was being trained how to draw a holstered weapon while seated at a conference room table, required to have at least one ‘look-out’ with a round chambered when meeting with Afghan counterparts, and be ready at any time for an insider attack.  What was that all about if the recent observation is something new?

Most generals state at the beginning of their tours that everything was messed-up by their predecessor while stating that they have the solution by which, at the end of their tour, they are able to declare victory.  I’m thankful that GEN Allen seems to have flipped this history on its head but wonder what he has been doing for 14+ months.

Let’s finally declare that the emperor has no clothes–that would hardly be a new trend.

Afghan Air Force growing financially independent

ISAF probably didn’t have this in mind when they established the goal to make the Afghan National Army, or Afghan Air Force, independent and self-sustaining: Afghan Air Force Probed in Drug RunningA complete story (if you don’t have a WSJ account) is at ABC News and elsewhere.

In addition to the donkey-borne IEDs, we now have flying drug mules–who said Afghans weren’t able to adapt and modernize?  It’s good to see that taxpayer dollars are finally going to something that will be endure in Afghanistan.

This puts Joint Ceremonies and operations in a whole new light.

Questioning the reliability of Afghans

President Obama issued an apology and is amazed that the violence in Afghanistan against U.S. and the coalition didn’t suddenly stop (By the way, why are we apologizing for destroying something the enemy is using to pass inflammatory, if not coordinating, information against us?). 

The GIRoA Ministry of Interior is conducting an investigation into the most recent killings perpetrated by ANSF personnel against coalition forces.  No doubt that’ll shed light on the situation.

ISAF leadership repeatedly asserts that infiltration and/or impersonations of Afghan Security Forces is not a problem even while “Green on Blue” violence increases. 

Now Fox News has stumbled onto something “new:” New violence stokes questions about reliability of Afghan partners in war.  For NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan (NTM-A), it is no big stretch to say that ANSF forces are the number one cause of death yet only now we are beginning to wonder if the Afghans are reliable.

Last year, an Afghan airman opened up an killed nine–and the Afghan Air Force is supposed to be among the most affluent groups in the ANSF.  Recently, the French suffered several dead due to the Afghans security forces. Short of an exhaustive search, it is safe to say these are fairly regular events.  Unfortunately, they have been treated as isolated and unrelated events and regarded as irregular which, coincidently, helps to preserve the illusion of progress.

Can there be any conclusion other than to question the reliability of the forces we’ve poured billions into over the last decade?  Maybe the solution is just to spill more blood and treasure.

Building an “Afghan Right” ANSF

A Washigton Post article from several months ago highlights some of the lessons learned in building infrastructure for the Afghan National Security Forces: In helping Afghanistan build up its security forces, U.S. is trimming the frills.  Then NTM-A Commanding General, LTG Caldwell, saw construction that made him cringe — but this construction was likely started 2 or 3 years ago before any lessons learned could be applied.

That raises an interesting dichotomy:  We can’t trust the ANSF with pedestal porcelain sinks and air conditioning but we can trust them with helicopters, a pilot school, up-armored humvees, a mobile strike force, and computers.  Maybe working more on the basics such as reading, weapons safety, and training them to drive would reduce the demand for flight medicsvehicle recovery techniques, and doctors.

Next time we rebuild a country, many more lessons will be available but we’ll probably reinvent the wheel anyway.