Tag Archives: Doctrine

‘Men who stare at goats’ and other government initiatives

With 76 countries ratifying the United Nations’ Convention on the Prohibition of Military or Any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques, one may wonder just how much the weather can be manipulated by the government (not to mention what else they might be up to).  [George Bush was trying to kill minorities in New Orleans with Hurricane Katrina.  He was just too dumb and hit Mississippi instead–but I digress.]

Adding to the stack of conspiracy theories will soon be this report from www.wired.comAir Force’s Top Brain Wants a ‘Social Radar’ to ‘See Into Hearts and Minds’

The capability analyzes behavior to predict future behavior.  Sounds like high-tech profiling–not necessarily something new.  But with the DoD funding millions on a program to evaluate behavior, who knows what it could become. 

I could care less how much anyone watches what I do, but if you start looking at my heart and mind, we have problems.  From the Holy Bible, God states in Jeremiah 17:9, “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?”  Apparently, the government is funding an effort to figure it out.  The Bible also declares God as a revealer of secrets in Daniel 2:47, “The king answered unto Daniel, and said, Of a truth it is, that your God is a God of gods, and a Lord of kings, and a revealer of secrets, seeing thou couldest reveal this secret.”  Imagine that–government with a god-complex.

Good news for anyone that ever clicked “liked” on this blog: “’We do better than human estimates, but not by much,’ one Pentagon-funded predictioneer admitted.”

If you’re excited to run-off and joint the New Earth Army, you may still be ahead of your time.

Advertisements

Lessons Ignored, Part II: Who needs doctrine?

Maybe I’ve overreached concerning the importance of doctrine.  Apparently the success of the United States’ military is not because of a well understood core of doctrine but because of our disregard for it:

One of the serious problems in planning the fight against American doctrine, is that the Americans do not read their manuals, nor do they feel any obligation to follow their doctrine.

–From a Soviet Junior Officer’s Notebook

NTM-A is following this doctrinal anarchy to the letter.  Some years ago, doctrine was written for the ANSF.  Since that time, hoards of Americans, Europeans, and other supporters have flooded the country (6-12 months at a time) and not only disregarded that doctrine but layered their own view of how an Army (or Police) ought to run.  Given the disdain the average soldier has for doctrine, their view of how things run is unlikely to be anything similar to anyone else, even if from the same background!

So instead of following any doctrine (good, bad, or indifferent), we train them from the beginning to disregard it and “fight on the fly.”  This probably works satisfactorily for the Taliban, Mujahideen, Hakkani Network, and warlords. 

Given the precedent  for new militaries, the entire U.S. effort will collapse under its own weight without a well established and understood doctrine forming the principles and common language from which all forces can operate (see FM 3.0, Appendix D).

New weapons clearing procedure

You think seeing U.S. Marines urinate on Taliban corpses was disturbing?  Check-out the U.S. Army’s new (unofficial) weapons clearing procedure:

From “The Big Picture” at http://www.boston.com (December, 2009)

Wait until the Marines find out about this. 

It’s all fun and games until someone loses an eye!

Captions speak louder than words

On a nearby desk the magazine PRISM, a publication of the Center for Complex Operations at the National Defense University, captured my attention for its numerous Afghanistan-related stories.  One article from the December 2011 edition, “War Comes to Bala Morghab: A Tragedy of Policy and Action in Three Acts,” depicted ISAF as Keystone Cops when trying to influence Bala Morghab District in 2008-2009.  The problem?  ISAF completely ignored the ‘shaping’ aspect of the COIN strategy.  Ultimately, they may have won a battle but lost a war.

In a second story, the magazine ‘shapes’ reader optimism via the finest of details.  Representative of our struggles in Afghanistan is the caption–yes, the caption–to the feature “Negotiating Afghanistan” (likely a fascinating story but as yet unread).  Below is the photo with caption as depicted in the print version of the magazine:

Nothing could more succinctly illustrate the beast created in Afghanistan.  “Don’t let them fail” has been the battle cry; whether in training, equipping, personnel accountability, logistics, or operations, we have created a painful dependency.

For our best and brightest military thinkers, overlooking the details isn’t nearly as painful as it is revealing.